Images of Henley 2019: The Deciding Day (Student and Junior Events) 

Some differing reactions to winning the Fawley.

29 July 2019

By Tim Koch

Tim Koch looks at those finalists that are studying applied rowing.

STUDENT EVENTS

THE TEMPLE CHALLENGE CUP M8+
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY ‘A’
beat
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY ‘A’, U.S.A.
3/4 length

For the second time in three years, Brookes won both the Ladies and the Temple. Having beaten Brookes ‘B’ earlier in the week, Northeastern found themselves against one of the strongest crews in Europe, one that ultimately proved too fast for them. Brookes crossed the line ¾ of a length ahead of Northeastern in what was a clear, but by no means easy, victory.
We did it.
Manhugs all round.
The highest of fives.
The winning Brookes Ladies’ Plate crew swim out to the winning Brookes Temple crew.

THE PRINCE ALBERT CHALLENGE CUP M4+
HARVARD UNIVERSITY, U.S.A.
beat
DURHAM UNIVERSITY
3/4 length

An understandably pensive looking Durham head for the start.
The last ten strokes.
Harvard were the favourites to win in many eyes after the first few days of racing, notably after defeating Brookes in the last few strokes on Saturday. Harvard opened up a modest 2/3 length lead over Durham at the Barrier. They extended this throughout the race, their lead fluctuating as Durham fought back – but the Americans passed the finish line 3/4 length up.

JUNIOR EVENTS

THE DIAMOND JUBILEE CHALLENGE CUP JW4x
LATYMER UPPER SCHOOL ‘A’
beat
HEADINGTON SCHOOL
1 3/4 lengths

Headington on the way to the start.
The Latymer crew did badly at May’s National Schools’ Regatta (second in the ‘B’ Final) but you never have guessed this from their confident and mature performance in this race; they dominated from the start and led all the way.
Celebrations with the coaches.
Dried off and posing with the headmaster.

THE PRINCESS ELIZABETH CHALLENGE CUP JM8+
ETON COLLEGE
beat
SCOTCH COLLEGE, MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA
1 1/4 lengths

The Scotch crew were physically very strong. Also, the press box was much taken with the retro hairstyles adopted by some of the Australian boys.
After a final last year that they will want to forget, Eton silenced all critics as they saw off Scotch College, the 2017 winners of the Princess Elizabeth. The crews were level until the Barrier, but it was the technically superior Eton crew that prevailed.
Yes!
This was the 14th time that Eton had won the PE since the event started in 1946. They have been losing finalists five times.
Dressed in the Old Light Blue. A proud father in the hue of Cambridge, his victorious son in that of Eton.

The College website says:

‘Eton Blue’ (which is rather more green than blue) appeared no later than the early 19th century to identify Eton sportsmen on the river and the cricket field. The colour was also adopted by the University of Cambridge for the Boat Race against Oxford in 1836, and they have kept it ever since. The traditional colour remained in use at Eton for a hundred years, but various pressures, financial and military, broke the link with the past, and now a pale blue (‘baby blue’) is often used by Eton sportsmen and others. There are moves afoot to re-adopt a distinctive colour, although these will take time to complete.

THE FAWLEY CHALLENGE CUP JM4x
LEANDER CLUB ‘A’
beat
HENLEY ROWING CLUB ‘A’
1 1/4 lengths

Leander on their way to race.
Henley follows their opposition to the start.
The Final of The Fawley had the two fastest junior quads in the country lined up against each other but it was not the close race that many were expecting. At May’s National Schools’ Regatta, Henley beat Leander but here Leander led from the start and were the superior crew.

Proof (were it needed) that winning is better than losing:

First place.
Second place.

A report on the King’s Cup will follow soon.

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