Images of Henley 2019: The Deciding Day (Intermediate and Club Events)

Balletic post-final celebrations from the Oxford Brooks Ladies’ Plate crew. For the second time in three years Brookes won both the Ladies and the Temple.

27 July 2019

By Tim Koch

Tim Koch looks at some of Henley’s most popular events.

INTERMEDIATE EVENTS

THE LADIES’ CHALLENGE PLATE M8+
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY ‘A’
beat
HOLLANDIA ROEICLUB, NETHERLANDS
1 length

Brookes won the Ladies for the third year in a row. Hollandia were never more than a length down, but their late surge was not enough and Brookes won with the fastest time of the day, 5 minutes and 59 seconds.

Daniel ‘Fatsculler’ Spring said in his Henley preview: They have established themselves as the top club crew in the country, and possibly the best club crew in Europe. They’ve not been beaten by domestic opposition since 2016 and earlier this season they raced at the Wedau Regatta in Duisburg, Germany. There they finished 2nd to the Deutschlandachter – the World Champion German M8 – by 1.5 seconds. Coach Henry Baillache-Webb has put together an outstanding squad system, probably the only one in Europe that could match the top collegiate programs in the USA.

Hollandia, the Dutch Under-23s, on their way to the start.

THE VISITORS’ CHALLENGE CUP M4-
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY AND LEANDER CLUB
beat|
AMSTERDAMSCHE STUDENTEN ROEIVEREENIGING NEREUS AND DELFTSCHE STUDENTEN ROEIVEREENIGING LAGA, NETHERLANDS
Easily

Cambridge and Leander approach the finish.
The official press release said of the race: ‘Spectators were privileged to witness some of the finest next generation of talent as Cambridge University and Leander Club stormed to victory in The Visitors’ Challenge Cup. The Dutch, A.S.R. Nereus & D.S.R. Laga, were simply not able to match the pace of the British who set a new Barrier record, equalled the Fawley record and smashed the course record by three seconds.’
In the “Telegraph”, Rachel Quarrell wrote: ‘Britain’s under-23 team is yet to be announced, but the likely men’s four and quad put on stunning displays, both beating Dutch crews using power and beautiful technique.’

THE PRINCE OF WALES CHALLENGE CUP M4x
EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY AND NOTTINGHAM ROWING CLUB
beat
ALGEMENE AMSTERDAMSCHE STUDENTEN ROEIVERENIGING SKØLL AND ALGEMENE UTRECHTSE STUDENTEN ROEIVERENIGING ORCA, NETHERLANDS
1 length

Edinburgh and Nottingham, British Under-23s, equalled the course record for this event, holding off a late charge by the Dutch.

CLUB EVENTS

THE THAMES CHALLENGE CUP M8+
ROEIVEREENIGING STUDENTEN VREIE UNIVERSITEIT OKEANOS, NETHERLANDS
beat
THAMES ROWING CLUB ‘A’
1 length

Thames Rowing Club Head Coach, Ben Lewis, demonstrating that ultimately all a coach can do is push his crew off the pontoon and collect their sweaty footwear. After that, both crew and coach are on their own. Thames has won the Thames Cup in three of the last four years (including an all-Thames final in 2017), a testimony to the strong squad developed by Lewis. This was his last Henley with the club.
It started well for Thames and they were 3/4 length up at Fawley. But the Dutch clung on and their push at Remenham saw them draw level and then away. Thames kept sprinting but were a length down at the finish.
An exhausted Thames and an ecstatic Okeanos.
Celebrations for RSVU Okeanos.
The great cocktail of Champagne and silver polish.

THE WYFOLD CHALLENGE CUP M4-
SYDNEY ROWING CLUB, AUSTRALIA
beat
NORSKE STUDENTERS ROKLUB, NORWAY
1 length

The Australians led all the way and gave Sydney its first Henley win since 2015.

THE BRITANNIA CHALLENGE CUP M4+
MOLESEY BOAT CLUB
beat
MERCANTILE ROWING CLUB, AUSTRALIA
1/2 length

Molesey Boat Club were losing finalists last year and were down until Remenham where they took the lead and held on until the finish.

Reports on the Junior and Student events and then on the King’s Cup will follow over the next few days.

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